B07 | Development of a micro particle sensor system to establish correlations between mechanical stress and cell functionality during biofabrication

Hydrodynamic forces during printing can cause enduring damage to living cells, their strength is however largely unknown. Here we will develop sensor particles (microcapsules, microgels) which in combination with computer models will close this knowledge gap. The sensor particles will give insight into the mechanical deformation while the closely corresponding simulations will allow us to calculate resulting mechanical stresses. Finally, by comparing with living cells we will be able to establish correlations between deformation, stress and cell damage during bioprinting.

Dr. Krystyna Albrecht
Prof. Dr. Stephan Gekle

Presentations:

Bezold C, Bächer C, Gekle S. (2018) Simulations of stem cells in microjets, Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG), DPG Spring Meeting Berlin, March 11 – 16, 2018 (Berlin, Germany)

Poster:

Müller S, Gekle S. (2018) Multiple-relaxation-time Lattice Boltzmann Implementation of Non-Newtonian Fluids, Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG), DPG Spring Meeting Berlin, March 11 – 16, 2018 (Berlin, Germany)

 

Johannes Herbig

Previous academic education: Master Funktionswerkstoffe 2016
Academic Advisor within SFB/TRR 225: Dr. Krystyna Albrecht
Location: University of Würzburg, Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry
Topic of thesis: „Mikrofluidische Herstellung polymerer Mikrogele und Mikrokapseln für die Biofabrikation“
Main techniques and methodologies to be used: Microfluidics, Layer-by-layer coating

Contact: Johannes.herbig@fmz.uni-wuerzburg.de

Sebastian Müller

Previous academic education: M. Sc. in Physics: “Simulation of Stem Cells in Shear Thinning Bioinks”
Academic Advisor within SFB/TRR 225: Prof. Dr. Stephan Gekle
Location: University of Bayreuth, Theoretical Physics VI
Topic of thesis: Computational estimate of cell damage in bioprinting processes
Main techniques and methodologies to be used: Lattice Boltzmann Simulations, Immersed-Boundary method, Shear thinning fluid models, different cell models

Contact: sebastian.j.mueller@uni-bayreuth.de